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[22 Apr 2014 | No Comment | ]

In early November of 1862, following the bloodletting at Sharpsburg, the Confederate Army crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains and moved eastward to the defense of Fredericksburg. The cavalry had a running battle with the enemy on nearly a daily basis. General J. E. B. Stuart CSA moved his men south of the Rappahannock River into the safety of Culpeper County at Waterloo Bridge. The exhausted troopers cooked breakfast while Maj. John Pelham positioned his artillery to cover the bridge. The morning passed quietly with no enemy in sight.
But the soldiers …

* Hidden History Facts »

[12 Jan 2014 | No Comment | ]

Captain Will Farley wrote his mother following the Battle of Williamsburg, Went into the 19th Miss. Regt.—then on picket in front of the enemy killed four men before the battle commenced; one of them Capt. of the 47th N.Y. Have his sword, a fine one.

The sword captured from the captain of the 47th New York was passed down in the Farley family. In 1923, following much research, and as an act or reconciliation, the Farley family returned the sword to the descendants of the captain of the 47th New York.
However, …

* Hidden History Facts »

[17 Jun 2013 | No Comment | ]

Went into the 19th Miss. Regt.—then on picket in front of the enemy killed four men before the battle commenced; one of them Capt. of the 47th N.Y. Have his sword, a fine one.*

* Hidden History Facts »

[30 Jan 2013 | No Comment | ]

At 4:30 a.m. April 12, 1861 tension filled the air in Charleston as soldiers manning two Confederate batteries of ten mortars were ordered to their posts. A young lieutenant stood, lanyard in hand, near the mortar he commanded. At word from the captain, the lieutenant jerked the lanyard and sent a shell screaming into the night sky.
The twenty-year-old lieutenant who participated in one of history’s pivotal moments was Henry Saxon Farley, younger brother of William Downs Farley. Sorely disappointed that he had not been in Charleston for the opening salvo, …

* Hidden History Facts »

[27 Oct 2012 | No Comment | ]

In this issue I am beginning a series of articles about one of Jeb Stuart’s most trusted scouts, South Carolinian William Downs Farley. There is so much to tell about this intrepid, legendary scout. So sit back and relax. We’re going on a long, long journey…

* Hidden History Facts »

[28 Dec 2011 | No Comment | ]

Where, you may be wondering, was McClellan before and after the marriage of A. P. Hill and his beloved Dolly? McClellan had left the army to take a job as chief engineers of the Illinois Central Railroad. But in March 1858 he was still pining away over Ellen Marcy. Along with the rest of the nation he read in the papers of the courageous winter rescue relief operation from Wyoming to New Mexico led by Capt. Marcy. 
He saw this as an opportunity and he penned a letter on impressively embossed …

* Hidden History Facts »

[27 Oct 2011 | No Comment | ]

As she stood between her brother and husband who would both gain fame as Confederate warriors, little could the new bride imagine that both would give their last full measure of devotion to the Confederacy.

* Hidden History Facts »

[29 Jul 2011 | No Comment | ]

Mrs. Marcy had mixed emotions about her daughter’s broken engagement to A. P. Hill. She too had won—and lost. Her hope was for Ellen to marry McClellan but that hope seemed blasted by the Hill affair.

* Hidden History Facts »

[22 May 2011 | No Comment | ]

Unsuspecting George McClellan returned to Washington and stepped into a swirling caldron….not only was Ellen engaged, but to his best friend, A. P. Hill.

* Hidden History Facts »

[22 Nov 2010 | One Comment | ]

Suitors were swarming around Ellen Marcy like moths to a flame. Ellen and her mother spent the winter of 1855-56 at the Willard Hotel in Washington. Who should be assigned to duty in Washington but McClellan’s close friend, the charming and dashing A. P. Hill.