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[31 Jan 2016 | 2 Comments | ]

Twenty-seven year old Michigan native Jack Falahee ?graduated from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. He is known for his breakout role as Connor Walsh in the ABC series “How to Get Away with Murder”. At 5’10” – 150 lbs. he is sturdier than the 5’8” – 100 lb. Stringfellow.

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[12 Jul 2010 | No Comment | ]

According to Virginia Morton, author of “Marching Through Culpeper,” former Confederate scout Frank Stringfellow died of a heart attack at age 73. See photos of grave…

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[23 May 2010 | No Comment | ]

Rev. Frank Stringfellow had led a life full of love and service to God. He could ask for no more, yet there was a dream hidden in his heart for one more blessing. His life had been spiritually rich, but the salary of a minister does provide material wealth. Wealth itself was not his goal, but the opportunity to visit the Holy Land was his most cherished dream. He wanted to walk where his Lord and Savior had walked, to see the sites where Christ had preached, and to absorb the power of those Holy shrines.

His lovely daughters had married well. Two of his daughters and their husbands gave Frank and Emma their dream cruise. In 1907, they joined a tour of ministers to Europe and the Holy Land. This life-changing journey in his sixty-seventh year rejuvenated Rev. Stringfellow’s energy to preach and be a faithful servant of the Lord. He wrote to one of his daughters, “How much of the good done to me can I transmit to others? I have had a great spiritual uplift, with it comes increased responsibility. I hope the light within me may never be put under a bushel, but be put upon the candle stand.”

And for the next six years he let his light shine brightly. Rev. Stringfellow’s philosophy of life can best be summarized in a letter he wrote his grown daughter encouraging her never to complain, “Serve God and your generation with an unselfish spirit, and the same sun which rose often on you in splendor may follow you in life, and come down in a blaze of glory. We can only do our part faithfully, and the thing which befalls us will be the best thing for us in the two lives which we must all live, the here and the hereafter.”*
Rev. Frank Stringfellow had led a life full of love and service to God. He could ask for no more, yet there was a dream hidden in his heart for one more blessing. His life had been spiritually rich, but the salary of a minister does provide material wealth. Wealth itself was not his goal, but the opportunity to visit the Holy Land was his most cherished dream. He wanted to walk where his Lord and Savior had walked, to see the sites where Christ had preached, and to absorb the power of those Holy shrines.

His lovely daughters had married well. Two of his daughters and their husbands gave Frank and Emma their dream cruise. In 1907, they joined a tour of ministers to Europe and the Holy Land. This life-changing journey in his sixty-seventh year rejuvenated Rev. Stringfellow’s energy to preach and be a faithful servant of the Lord. He wrote to one of his daughters, “How much of the good done to me can I transmit to others? I have had a great spiritual uplift, with it comes increased responsibility. I hope the light within me may never be put under a bushel, but be put upon the candle stand.”

And for the next six years he let his light shine brightly. Rev. Stringfellow’s philosophy of life can best be summarized in a letter he wrote his grown daughter encouraging her never to complain, “Serve God and your generation with an unselfish spirit, and the same sun which rose often on you in splendor may follow you in life, and come down in a blaze of glory. We can only do our part faithfully, and the thing which befalls us will be the best thing for us in the two lives which we must all live, the here and the hereafter.”*
According to Virginia Morton, author of “Marching Through Culpeper,” visiting the Holy Land was Rev. Frank Stringfellow’s cherished dream. His grown daughters and their spouses made that dream a reality in 1907.

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[31 Mar 2010 | No Comment | ]

Former Confederate spy Rev. Frank Stringfellow continued to employ his legendary ingenuity and sense of humor to the challenges he faced as a minister. But there is no better example than his achievements as a rainmaker in Boydton, Va.

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[25 Feb 2010 | No Comment | ]

Ex Confederate scout Frank Stringfellow had another trick up his sleeve to garner permission to be a chaplain in the Spanish-American war.

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[28 Dec 2009 | One Comment | ]

According to Virginia Morton, author of “Marching Through Culpeper,” former Confederate scout Frank Stringfellow became an Episcopal minister at age 36 and used his ingenuity and speaking engagements of his wartime adventures to raise money to build churches across Virginia.

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[29 Nov 2009 | No Comment | ]

According to Virginia Morton, author of “Marching Through Culpeper,” Confederate scout Frank Stringfellow arrived in Hamilton, Canada in March, 1866 where he joined many ex-Confederates in search of a new life…

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[26 Oct 2009 | 4 Comments | ]

When the war ended Frank Stringfellow was 25 years old, penniless, and there was a $10,000 price on his head. His family home “The Retreat” had mysteriously burned when Union forces occupied the area. Lincoln had been assassinated, and the blood of revenge was running hot.

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[27 Aug 2009 | 2 Comments | ]

He had run about a mile as dawn broke amidst rain. He heard the sound of horses behind him and knew the enemy was on his trail. He couldn’t outrun them and needed to find a hiding place quick.

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[28 Jul 2009 | One Comment | ]

The Federals rode on each side of the carriage, but occasionally they had to drop back because of the narrowness of the road. During these precious moments the scout began eating the incriminating letters he carried. He had a piece of cake which made the letters more “palatable.”